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正在阅读:所有的中国人都擅长数学吗?

所有的中国人都擅长数学吗?

Are all Chinese people good at math?

爱问 2018-08-29 17:40:29 中国人擅长数学
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有句老话是​“勤奋的亚洲学生”。

There’s an old cliché of a “hard-working Asian student.”

This reputation for hard work is the culmination of China’s long tradition of scholarship, along with intense competition and an overwhelming demand for academic excellence.

Just take a look at how intense China’s National College Entrance Examination is…

Students entering test examination buildings must use fingerprint and iris-matching equipment to verify their identities under the watchful eyes of security guards. Meanwhile, drones hover above and scans for radio signals sent in or out.

The “National Examination” was central to China’s feudal history prior to the nationalist revolution. Traditionally, to succeed in China, a man (women were not allowed) must score highly in the national exam. The best performers would be trained to become local officials working for the government.

The concept of “Sheng Guan Fock Choi” is deeply-rooted in China’s DNA. It means “to be promoted in the ranks of the government and become wealthy”, and it has influenced Chinese culture for millennia. Academic achievement is viewed as an ingredient of a successful and complete life.

Photo: Masterstudies.com

Getting into the best universities is competitive in any country. But it reaches a different dimension in China. The country’s one-child policy (which was only abandoned in January 2016) means that parents are even more intensely focused on ensuring that their only child excels and is part of China’s growing middle class. Education is critical to that objective.

The traditional nature of family throughout much of Asia, whereby children (or in this case, the child) care for their parents in old age, means that parents have a strong self-interest in ensuring that their child does well in school – so that he can later earn enough to support them. Additionally, more so than in many other countries, the college a Chinese student attends has an immediate impact on career and even marriage prospects.

And China’s macroeconomic backdrop is slowly becoming less supportive for young people. The gradual slowing of the Chinese economy has made the job market more challenging. Additionally, the slow but steady shift of the focus of the economy away from manufacturing and towards services means that the definition of a well-paying job is rapidly changing. Moving up the socioeconomic ladder is increasingly challenging in China.

As a result, Chinese families will go to great lengths – and spend much of their wealth – to improve their child’s educational preparation, and thus his chances of a successful (and well-paying) life. Also, people already in the workforce or close to joining it are under heightened pressure to have practical and applicable skills.

The pressure starts in kindergarten. Parents scramble to enrol their children in the best pre-schools, which in turn lead to the best middle and high schools. This has created an educational arms race as parents spend their income on private education to give their children a better shot at the top universities. For example, there are now more private than public kindergartens in China, according to consultants McKinsey & Company.

So Asian societies are notoriously competitive, and China is no different. Parents in Singapore, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong and China send their children for extra tuition after school. The “fear of falling behind” goes hand-in-hand with the pride of “getting ahead”. The two work together to create a sense that life is a competition.

This was written by Stansberry Churchouse Research, an independent investment research company based in Singapore and Hong Kong that delivers investment insight on Asia and around the world. Click here to sign up to receive the Asia Wealth Investment Daily in your inbox every day, for free.

有句老话是“勤奋的亚洲学生”。

这种勤奋工作的声誉是中国悠久的学术传统的顶峰,伴随着激烈的竞争和对学术卓越的压倒性需求。

看看中国高考有多激烈……

进入考场的学生必须使用指纹和虹膜匹配设备,在保安的监视下验证身份。与此同时,无人机在上空盘旋,扫描进出的无线电信号。

在民族主义革命之前,“国试”是中国封建历史的核心。传统上,要想在中国取得成功,一个男人(女人是不允许的)必须在全国考试中取得高分。表现最好的人将接受培训,成为为政府工作的地方官员。

“升官发财”的概念在中国根深蒂固。它的意思是“晋升到政府的行列,成为富人”,它影响了中国几千年的文化。学术成就被视为成功和完整生活的一个组成部分。

进入最好的大学在任何国家都是很有竞争力的。但它在中国却达到了另一个层面。中国的独生子女政策(直到2016年1月才被废除)意味着,父母们更加关注确保他们的独生子女出类拔萃,并成为中国不断壮大的中产阶级的一部分。教育是实现这一目标的关键。

传统的家庭在亚洲大部分地区,自然,孩子(或在这种情况下,孩子)在年老时照顾他们的父母,意味着父母有强烈的利益在确保他们的孩子在学校表现出色,所以,他后来能挣到足够的钱支持他们。此外,与许多其他国家相比,中国学生就读的大学对职业甚至婚姻前景都有直接影响。

中国的宏观经济背景正慢慢变得不那么支持年轻人。中国经济的逐渐放缓使就业市场更具挑战性。此外,经济重心从制造业向服务业缓慢而稳定地转移,意味着高薪工作的定义正在迅速改变。在中国,社会经济地位的上升越来越具有挑战性。

因此,中国家庭将竭尽全力——并花费大量财富——来提高孩子的教育准备,从而提高他成功(和高薪)生活的机会。此外,已经进入职场或即将加入职场的人面临着更大的压力,要求他们具备实用和适用的技能。

压力从幼儿园开始。家长们争先恐后地让自己的孩子进入最好的幼儿园,这反过来又会让孩子进入最好的中学和高中。这引发了一场教育军备竞赛,因为家长们把自己的收入花在私立教育上,以便让自己的孩子在顶尖大学获得更好的机会。例如,咨询公司麦肯锡(McKinsey & Company)的数据显示,中国现在的私立幼儿园比公立幼儿园多。

因此,亚洲社会的竞争是出了名的激烈,中国也不例外。新加坡、日本、韩国、香港和中国的父母放学后送孩子去补习。“对落后的恐惧”与“取得进步”的自豪感是相辅相成的。这两个人一起创造了一种生活是竞争的感觉。

本文来源:https://www.quora.com

免责声明:本文编译自互联网,不代表《歪果仁看中国》的观点和立场。

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